If Hell is as hot as July and August has been then I guess I need to go to church more often. Honestly, I don’t know if I can take much more of this. As one lady told me “everything sweats”.

As we all know, it has been hot, hot, hot! There is something hateful about these hot days. It has a burn to it. It has a taste to it, while not tast-ing like anything. It makes every mile longer. It makes every breath harder. It makes every red light longer.

All joking aside, the heat is very dangerous — and deadly. Keeping your bike in good working order is the best way to keep you from over-heating. Your bike may not keep you cooler but if you break down on the side of the road you could cook while waiting for help. Even if you get help, it is still a struggle to get it going or to get it towed out of there.

Check your oil and check your tire pressure. The engine is working harder in the summer and those temperatures will expand and countract your air pressure.

During this heat, rain storms just seems to pop up so be sure to keep your rain suit handy.

In the book 98.6 Degrees: The Art of Keeping Your Ass Alive, Cody Lundin (the co-star of Dual Survivor) does a great job of explaining that the first rule of survival is keeping your core body temperature at 98.6 degrees. That is certainly the case while on a motorcycle. Depending on where you are riding, a motorcy-clist can change extremes within minutes. For example, while riding on the Blue Ridge Parkway, a rider can go from a couple of thousand feet to five or six thou-sand feet elevation in a matter of miles.

While climbing up a mountain a good rule of thumb for figuring temparture is that for every thousand feet subtract 3 degrees. That will help you figure out how to dress as you go.

I know we are not in the mountains and we are dealing with the painful heat. So here are a few things that will help you ride and survive in the heat:

• Hydrate with H2O

• Don’t drink alcohol

• Carry water or take a Camelback

08-17-11-jim-jones.jpg• Always have spare water with you on your bike.

• If you have a passenger carry spare water for them (just in case of breakdown)

• Early to bed, early to rise — and ride early

• Don’t wait until you are thirsty to drink water, hydrate

• Force water even if you are not thirsty

• Wear eye protection

• Have a well vented helmet

• Wear cotton shirts

• Soak your shirt in water (poor man’s air conditioner)

• Don’t use a dew rag (they trap heat)

• At stops find shade if possible

• Take breaks often• Purchase vented safety gear

• Wear quick-drying nylon/spandex fabric, (disperses moisture)

• Don’t sacrifice safety for comforts sake•Wear sunscreen

• Hydrate with H2O!

One of the less noted dangers of the heat is that people are just irritable. I don’t know what it is but when people are hot they don’t pay at-tention while driving. People seem to drive more erratic. Be very careful out there.

Stay Cool!

Photo: In the book 98.6 Degrees: The Art of Keeping our Ass Alive, Cody Lundin (the co-star of Dual Survivor) does a great job of explaining that the first rule of survival is keeping your core body temperature at 98.6 degrees.

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