https://www.upandcomingweekly.com/


  • 16 ShoesLooking for the right shoe for your activity can become a confusing search, especially when it comes to running and walking shoes. The racks are beckoning with shoes that display colorful combinations and elaborate structural compositions. The average person has little idea what they are looking for other than the eye is drawn to the appeal of the shoe. Shoes can run upward to more than $200 and you may feel that is an ouch for a shoe selection! Is the investment worth it? The answer is yes. Let’s look at the difference between walking, running and shoes for group fitness classes.

    Walking shoes are structured differently than running shoes and offer more bend and flexibility. The distribution of weight remains even while walking and rolls from the heel to the ball of the foot. A running shoe has a thicker heel for cushion and a thicker wedge for support and forward movement. Structure and stability are the main design composition for the absorption of body weight and heel strikes.

    Not one shoe is a fit all for group fitness classes. In a Spin class it is advised to wear a stiffer soled shoe because softer soled shoes tend to flex over the pedal and could result in injuries. Spin shoes are designed to click into the bike to improve stability and pedaling efficiency.

    Dance based fitness classes are designed for movement. Consider investing in a shoe that is designed for lateral support with little or no tread on the sole. This type of shoe allows lateral movement and to pivot without putting stress on the joints.

    Boot camp and weightlifting classes are safer with a shoe that is structured for stability and weight distribution.

    Other group fitness classes, such as step and kick boxing, require shoes that offer absorption of the balls of the feet for dynamic movement. Classes that involve movement associated with the feet like barre and yoga also have a type of footwear that is safe for the activity. A barre or yoga sock comes with gel bands on the bottom that help with the participants stability and reduce the chance of slipping and injury.

    The bottom line is to get shoes fitted by a professional for your activity, who can offer an analysis that may include your gait and foot type. If you engage in the same activity more than three times a week select a shoe designed specifically for that activity. Get fitted for your shoe towards the end of the day, due to shifts in fluid retention. For activities taking place consistently at the same time each day the consideration of a fit may be more beneficial for that time.

    It is also important to select a quality sock and to wear the sock when tying on selections.

    A quality athletic shoe for running or walking should provide 350 to 500 miles of performance. Being aware of how the shoe is wearing and if it needs to replaced, are important observations to prevent ankle and knee injuries. Observing the wear patterns on the bottom of the shoe, especially at the heel is a good indicator for replacement and if the soles of the shoe are worn flat. It can be a hard decision for a purchase with a mounting price tag, but remember that your feet are an investment. Proper shoe fit is essential to avoid injuries, while allowing maximum performance for your activities.

  • 20 rockn logo jpegIt is that time again, time to grab a chair and a friend and head out for a night of free music. Rock’n On The River is back Aug. 27 at 6 p.m. with two amazing bands.

    The free event will take place at 1122 Person St. in Fayetteville, behind Deep Creek Grill. Parking for the event will begin at 5 p.m.

    Greg Adair, the organizer of the Rock’n On The River concert series, says “The idea was to create another free family event — a smaller scale of the Dogwood Festival. It began in 2018.”

    This upcoming show features Throwback Collaboration Band and North Tower.

    Known locally as TCB, Throwback Collaboration Band plays rhythm and blues favorites, dance and old school. The music crosses the 70s, 80s and 90s, creating a good blend of music that serves up something special for everyone.

    The band is made up of six musicians to include A.D. Thomas, Mark “Duce” Thomas, Michael Counts, Moshe Haire, Richard Bradford and Sybil Pinkney.

    The group has been playing together for more than three years. All musicians are over 50 years old, with the most recent addition, new member Moshe Haire. TCB appeals to a variety of audience, especially older couples in their 30s and up.

    Mark Thomas says of the event, “It is exciting. The venue caters to all walks of life — kids, adults, open air, stake out a good spot — get there early for the free environment.”

    Currently, TCB is playing in venues such as the Dogwood Festival and Dirtbag Ales, the North Carolina State Fair and several local area night spots. Before COVID, they were scheduled to perform at the Segra Stadium for Woodpeckers baseball games.

    “We really hope to see that opportunity come back,” says A.D. Thomas. “Many of the songs we do are from the 70s, 80s and more current stuff. It’s a clean family-oriented show, so we like to see people have fun and see how wonderful it is to come together.”

    North Tower will take the stage at 8:15 p.m. The band has been playing together since 1980. The band consists of Larry Dean, Jeff Hinson, Steve Davis, Tom Bagley, Marty Gilbert, Mark Bost and Ben Shaw.

    The Raleigh-based band strives to deliver a diverse set list to entertain audiences with R&B, oldies, beach, rock ‘n’ roll, mix of adult contemporary, uptown funky and mostly older stuff.

    “North Tower is the most versatile band we utilize at the Raleigh Civic Center,” says Jim Lavery, Marketing Director of the Raleigh Civic Center. “Whether for a convention, private party or our large ‘Alive After Five’ crowds, they always come through for us.”

    Rock’n On The River is a free live concert, sponsored by Healy Wholesale, Bob 96.5 FM radio and Up & Coming Weekly. Beverages and food will be available from Healy Wholesale and Deep Creek Grill. The audience is responsible for bringing chairs or something to sit on. Coolers and outside food are prohibited at this event. Pets are also not allowed onto the concert grounds.

    The parking fee is $5 per person. The event is first come first serve, as the venue can only host 1,200 to 1,400 people.

    “Bringing a well-rounded live concert series to get people out after lockdowns in 2020 and having something people will enjoy listening to is the goal,” says Adair. “Each monthly concert showcases a different genre of music, bringing people together.”

    For more information, head to the Rock’n On The River’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/Rockn-On-The-River-271048666818630/

    Pictured below: Throwback Collaboration Band (left) will kick off Rock'n On The River at 6 p.m. on Aug 27. (Photo courtesy www.facebook.com/TCB2019) North Tower takes the stage at 8:15 p.m. to entertain folks with their versatile playlist decades in the making. (Photo courtesy Rock'n On The River).

    13 TCB

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  • 11 Intersection 1Methodist University has a decade-plus reputation for presenting unique exhibitions at one of Fayetteville’s premier art venues — the David McCune International Art Gallery. So, it’s no surprise that its fall exhibition will be both unique in presentation and experience for the audience.

    Opening at McCune, located in the Bethune Center for Visual Arts on the MU campus, the free exhibition titled Intersection will be open to the campus community and public until Dec. 1. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday each week (except on MU holidays). The gallery follows all campus safety protocols related to COVID-19. For more information visit https://www.methodist.edu/

    “Like all of our shows, this one will feature amazing artists and their works,” said MU Professor of Art Vilas Tonape. “But it will also be very unique in that it will lead the guest to an experience of appreciating not just the similarities of the art being presented, but also the differences. It’s truly an intersection, where people will visit the gallery from all walks of life and enjoy both commonality and differences. All are welcome and will enjoy this exhibit.”

    Intersection will feature the works (which are for sale) of Andréa Keys Connell, Zhimin Guan, Sondra (Soni) Martin and Winter Rusiloski. Each has presented their works both nationally and internationally and hold positions as instructors at institutions of higher learning.

    •Rusiloski: Investigating abstracted landscapes for 20 years; more than 30 juried exhibitions around the world since 2016; paintings in public and private collections; an assistant professor of Painting in the Baylor University Department of Art and Art History.

    •Martin: Extensive commissions, grants and awards; works in private and corporate collections; expertise in studio arts (sculpture, printmaking, painting) and contemporary art theory; a professor of Visual Art at Fayetteville State University.

    •Guan: Featured in more than 200 professional exhibitions, including 20 solo shows; pieces in permanent museum collections in the U.S., China, and Singapore; a professor of Art at Minnesota State University Moorhead.

    •Connell: More than a dozen solo exhibitions; featured in numerous publications; taught workshops on figure sculpting at craft schools; an associate professor of Ceramics in the Department of Fine Arts at Appalachian State University.

    “This unique selection of artists brings paintings and sculptures together in an exciting way that allows the viewer to contemplate multiple dimensions and medium’s ability to play with the intersection between landscape, figure and ground,” said Connell.

    Each of the artists — and certainly Tonape, the curator — have an appreciation for the gallery, which has had numerous successful exhibitions that featured artists such as Warhol, Chagall, Rodin, Picasso, and most recently, Rembrandt. The University, Division of Fine and Performing Arts, and gallery also showcase exhibitions of work from MU students, faculty, staff and local artists.

    “I’m very excited to be a part of such an outstanding exhibition in a stellar international art gallery,” said Rusiloski.

    Tonape knows the quality of the art being presented, and offering that would certainly be successful in itself, but he was purposeful in his efforts to bring artists and work that would resonate with students.

    Intersection showcases many perspectives and diversity of work, which is perfect for a liberal arts university,” he said. “We have classes for painting, abstract painting, ceramics and sculpture, and the students can see how these forms of art can work together and also be very different … they can see the show and at some level, realize they either pertain to their study right now, or they will in the future.”

    All similarly in one place, but all undeniably unique, the fall exhibition at the McCune Gallery at Methodist University is truly an “Intersection.”

    For more information on the exhibition or Methodist University visit https://www.methodist.edu/.

    Pictured: The Intersection exhibition features the work of four artists: Winter Rusiloski, Soni Martin, Zhimin Guan and Andrea Keys Connell. (Photo by Gabrielle Allison)

  • 9 Barton5Cape Fear Studios will host an open reception for its latest exhibit on Aug. 27 from 6-8 p.m. The exhibit highlights the eclectic paintings and sculptures of Barton Hatcher.

    Growing up on his grandfather’s farm in Bladen County, Hatcher began using his artistic and creative talent when he was only six years old. A self-taught artist and mixed media sculptor, Hatcher’s work is infused an elevated sense of style and pays playful attention to unexpected details. Aa an avid gardener and fly fisherman, Barton draws inspiration for his artistic designs from nature itself.

    Fans of Hatcher’s art see a transcendent quality, earning him a state-wide following. He has been able to showcase his talent in several North Carolina galleries. On occasion, clients have commissioned Hatcher to create custom art designs that draw from their individual tastes and desires. His work is in several private art collections from North Carolina to New Jersey.

    Following his life-long admiration for nature and the outdoors, Hatcher owns and operates Gardens by Barton, a landscape design business based in Wilmington. In business, Hatcher uses his artistic talents to create uniquely tailored gardens, including building hardscapes such as arbors, trellises and garden patios.

    Before he started that business, Hatcher worked for Cape Craftsmen of Elizabethtown for more than 30 years where he served as an art buyer and designed and built prototypes for furniture. Through the many years of designing furniture and home décor, his art has evolved into the style today that he refers to as “contemporary abstract.”

    Whether it is furniture, sculpture, gardens or canvas, Hatcher’s passion for creating rich, thoughtful and extraordinary designs saturates everything he touches.

    The Studio’s workshops and retail section will also be open to visitors during the free public reception. The Studio is located at 148 Maxwell St. in Fayetteville. Hours of operations are Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

    For more information email artgallery@capefearstudios.com, call 910-433-2986 or visit www.capefearstudios.com.

    Pictured: Cape Fear Studios' newest exhibit features art by Barton Hatcher. (Photos courtesy Cape Fear Studios)

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  • 21 Truman for pageSchool is back in session, and the lazy, hazy days of summer are drawing to an end. The minds of teachers, parents and guardians return to the three Rs and resources to enhance and support these and other essential skills. Kidsville News!, the Cape Fear region’s fun, family publication for students in grades K-6, is here to help.

    Kidsville News! promotes education, reading and good character traits for students and offers a variety of free and fun articles, games, coloring activities, puzzles, kid-friendly recipes, career exploration and more.

    Resources you’ll recognize fill the publication pages, such as the NASA Night Sky Network, James Patterson’s Read Kiddo Read book reviews, Kids First movie reviews, NOAA weather and Sheri Amsel’s Exploring Nature. Find all this, a local community calendar and a letter from Truman the Dragon just for the kids in each monthly issue.

    Created in 1998 by newspaper publisher Bill Bowman as a local and self-sustaining “newspaper in education” program in his community of Fayetteville, North Carolina, the publication has a proven track record.

    Accolades for Kidsville News! include receiving recognition from the Parents’ Choice Foundation and the National Parents’ Choice Award in 2008 and 2012. (www.parents-choice.org/aboutus.cfm)

    Each Kidsville News! issue offers teacher/parent “Brainwork” online activities that extend the learning through printable, downloadable worksheets adaptable for home or school use. Visit www.kdisvillenews.com to view the Cape Fear region’s flagship edition or find a copy in a newsstand near you.

  • 06 Thom Tillis 2Sen. Thom Tillis, R-NC, spent more time than initially allocated on the campus of Fayetteville Technical Community College Aug 18. He was escorted by Dr. Larry Keen, FTCC President.

    Tillis toured the college’s newest facility -- a general classroom building. But it’s much more than that. The structure on Ft. Bragg Rd. houses cyber warfare computer technology laboratories and classrooms where students learn how to battle via information networks.

    Tillis is spending time visiting areas of his home state during the congressional summer recess. He won re-election to a second six-year term in November, 2020.

    Tillis, 60, a former IBM consultant and state House speaker, has been a consistent proponent of wearing masks during the pandemic, but he tested positive for COVID-19 in early October.

  • 07 Charles Evans 3Cumberland County Commissioner Charles Evans says he hopes to replace Rep. Richard Hudson, R-NC, as North Carolina’s 8th District Congressman.

    Evans currently serves as chairman of the board. In a statement on his congressional campaign website, Evans said that people often complain the two major parties “seem almost indistinguishable.”

    He filed with the Federal Election Commission in the spring and has been fundraising.

    “Under the new administration and what our president is trying to do to assist those of us that aren’t as fortunate as others — that’s been my advocacy for a long time, since I’ve been in the political arena,” he said.

    With the 2020 Census, North Carolina will add a 14th congressional seat to the U.S. House of Representative. The tar heel state’s Republican-majority General Assembly will redraw the map.

    Evans has been elected countywide three times since 2010. He also served two terms on the Fayetteville City Council from 2005 to 2009.

    Pictured: Charles Evans, Chairman of the Cumberland County Commission

  • 05 AA logoThis year’s All American Week, hosted by the 82nd Airborne Division and scheduled for Aug. 30 — Sept. 2, has been postponed due to the deployment to Afghanistan.

    “All American Week has been a proud tradition for our Division, current events and the activation of our Immediate Response Force requires us to reschedule,” said Maj. Gen. Christopher Donahue, the 82nd Airborne Division commander. “Postponing this event is hard for all of us, but we are working to find a new time to celebrate with our All American veterans, families and friends.”

    For over 30 years, All American Week has been open to the public to celebrate veterans and honor active duty service members, featuring sporting competitions, ceremonies and memorials. After 18 months of lockdown, All American Week was meant to build esprit-de-corps, bring the community together, and celebrate 104 years of service toward the nation. The first All American Week was held by the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, N.C. in 1986. In its inaugural year, the week began with a Division Run, sport competitions, a memorial, and a Division Review. In recent years, the Division has updated the Airborne Review an airborne operation, air assault and a demonstration of modern battle techniques.

    The dates for All American Week will be published as soon as they are available.

  • 04 82nd deploysThe 82nd Airborne Division’s 1st Brigade Combat Team is on duty at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan.

    The brigade is the division’s Immediate Response Force, America’s rapid response team. It is able to deploy within 18 hours of notification. “This is what the 82nd does and they do it very well,” said Pentagon spokesman John Kirby.

    The 82nd trains for airborne assault operations into enemy areas with a specialization in airfield seizure. The 82nd's Immediate Response Force has seen action in recent years deploying on News Year’s Eve 2019 to Iraq to help secure the U.S. embassy as it came under attack by Iranian-linked Shia militias.

    The Division again deployed troops in the summer of 2020 to the Nation’s Capital Region in response to civil disturbances in Washington, D.C.

    The division’s commander, Maj. Gen. Christopher Donahue, is leading the paratroopers in Afghanistan.

    Pictured: Paratroopers with 1st Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division board a plane enroute to Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo courtesy 82nd Airborne Division)

  • 03 pregnant womenRecent research is supporting the safety of COVID-19 vaccinations for pregnant women. Though pregnant women were excluded from the initial clinical trials for the vaccines — as is standard practice for all vaccine trials — almost 140,000 pregnant women have voluntarily joined the CDC’s V-safe COVID-19 Vaccine Pregnancy Registry since December, 2020.

    Cape Fear Valley Perinatology’s Maternal Fetal Medicine specialist Stuart Shelton, M.D. said this is an issue that has come up a lot lately with his patients. Dr. Shelton is the only maternal fetal medicine specialist, or perinatologist in Cumberland County. He has been practicing in Fayetteville 19 years.

    “So far, the data show no increased risk of miscarriage, birth defects, preterm birth. or stillbirth,” Dr. Shelton said. “Basically, there’s no increased risk of any adverse pregnancy outcomes. Data are still being collected and analyzed.”

    Shelton said he tells all his patients the same thing when they ask about getting a COVID-19 vaccine.

    “I think the vaccine is safe, and I tell the patient that her risk of pregnancy complications is much higher if she gets COVID infection than it is with the vaccine,” he said. “And right now, we don’t know of any increased risks associated with the vaccine. If it was one of my family members or friends, I would highly recommend they get the vaccine without any reservation.”

    That’s not just his personal opinion. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine have highly recommended the vaccine for pregnant women and lactating women.

    “And the reason for that is they feel the vaccine is safe, and we know that if a woman gets COVID while pregnant, she has a higher risk of complications,” Stuart said.

    “Pregnant women with COVID-19 have a three-times higher risk of being admitted to the ICU, and about two to three times higher risk of being on a ventilator. Their chances of dying from complications of COVID, compared with a woman who is not pregnant, are about twice as high.”

    Shelton said that the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are the best choices for women of childbearing age because of some very rare complications that have occurred in reproductive-age women who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

    Those complications were not related to pregnancy. However, the best choice for any person is the vaccine they are willing to take. For some women with severe needle phobias, the one-shot advantage of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine could make it the right choice for them.

    Though Dr. Shelton typically sees women who are already pregnant, he says rumors that vaccines cause infertility are unfounded based on available evidence. As noted by ACOG, given the mechanism of action and safety profile of mRNA vaccines (Pfizer and Moderna), COVID-19 mRNA vaccines are not a cause of infertility.

  • 02 Cuomo GOV FBAndrew Cuomo has resigned as a three-term Governor of New York after a parade of women alleged improper conduct and sexual harassment. Here is some of what he said in his official statement.

    “I thought a hug and putting my arm around a staff person while taking a picture was friendly, but she found it to be too forward."

    "I kissed a woman on the cheek at a wedding and I thought I was being nice, but she felt that it was too aggressive."

    "I have slipped and called people ‘honey,’ ‘sweetheart’ and ‘darling.’ I mean it to be endearing, but women found it dated and offensive."

    "I said on national TV to a doctor wearing PPE and giving me a COVID nasal swab, ‘You make that gown look good.’ I was joking, obviously, otherwise I wouldn’t have said it on national TV. But she found it disrespectful."

    "I have been too familiar with people. My sense of humor can be insensitive and off-putting. I do hug and kiss people casually, women and men. I have done it all my life …. In my mind, I’ve never crossed the line with anyone, but I didn’t realize the extent to which the line has been redrawn."

    "There are generational and cultural shifts that I just didn’t fully appreciate, and I should have. No excuses.”

    Cuomo is correct on both counts. Women today are less willing to tolerate behaviors we have tolerated in the past. And, he should have known better.

    I am Exhibit A of “generational and cultural shifts.” I have a photograph of myself with then U.S. Senator Al Franken of Minnesota taken at a political fundraiser in 2016 before Franken’s own fall for bad boy behavior.

    We are standing beside a dining room table, and he has his arm around my shoulder. No groping that all women find offensive, but it is telling that I never even noticed that a man I had met only minutes before had his hand on my bare shoulder until I saw the photo. A younger woman would have been far more conscious of physical contact than I was.

    Among the most bizarre aspects of Cuomo’s behavior is that he publicly positioned himself as a women’s rights and feminist advocate, all the while behaving like what back in the day was called a “male chauvinist pig,” or MCP for short.

    Cuomo, like millions of other men including Harvey Weinstein, Charlie Rose, Bill Cosby, Donald Trump, and countless ordinary men have not read, much less acknowledged, the change memo.

    Cuomo et al., men of a “certain age,” apparently believe they are not subject to the same rules, and laws for that matter, regarding human interactions that apply to the rest of us. Famous men have fallen, flamed out, or otherwise dropped from sight, as have many average Joes, believing themselves special and exempt.

    “Honey, sweetheart, and darling” are one thing, and some men may never get the point on that score, even though women keep trying.

    A lawyer friend whose client asked her to wear a certain dress to a meeting, told him, “sure, as soon as you pick it up from the cleaners.”

    Even the most boorish guys sometimes get it after taking such incoming from women they offend.

    Unwanted touching, groping, harassment, threatening job security are something else altogether, and men have lost families, careers and freedom over them.

    I have to believe men are getting the message, whether they like it or not. Cuomo et al., have become the poster boys of unacceptable, sometimes criminal, behavior.

    Public humiliation, not to mention prison time, generally gets people’s attention, and they are changing behaviors, however slowly.

    Cuomo’s resignation looks like progress to me.

    Pictured above: New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. (Photo courtesy www.facebook.com/GovernorAndrewCuomo/)

     

  • 01 service pnp cwpbh 03100 03132vFort Bragg is going to be renamed.

    Last year, Congress passed a law that forced the renaming of military bases with ties to the Confederacy like Fort Bragg, named after Confederate General Braxton Bragg.

    Now, a Commission from Washington, D.C. is meeting to develop a report on base renaming for the Secretary of Defense.

    If our community doesn’t engage, it will be this Commission that decides the new name of our base. I think that is wrong.

    In June 2020, when Congress was considering this move, I said any decision regarding renaming the base should be made by the Fort Bragg community. I still believe that is the case.

    This is a very tough issue for many in our community and I appreciate that there is a lot of passion on both sides.

    Now is the time for our community to come together. We need to respect one another and listen to one another. We can let this situation tear us apart, or we can use it to bring us together.

    Whether you agree or disagree, Braxton Bragg’s name will be removed from the base. Despite my belief that we should remove his name, I recognize the name Fort Bragg has meaning that transcends Braxton Bragg.

    When I visit with heads of state anywhere in the world and I tell them I represent Fort Bragg, their eyes light up. The reason is because the world recognizes and respects the men and women of our Airborne and Special Forces who have fought, bled and died to free the oppressed and spread peace and liberty throughout the world. Their sacrifices, as well as those by every family who has been stationed at Fort Bragg, should be honored.

    On Aug. 11, the Renaming Commission held a meeting with several community leaders at Fort Bragg. Before their meeting, I spoke with members of the Commission and I challenged them to do a better job to engage and listen to key voices across our community.

    Several new names for Fort Bragg were suggested at that meeting, but one stands out. One name suggested, in my opinion, erases any stigma associated with Braxton Bragg while also recognizing the heritage associated with our Airborne and Special Forces communities. That name is of an accomplished Union General in the Civil War who was later a Member of Congress and the U.S. Minister to Mexico.

    His name is Edward S. Bragg.

    There is precedent for a community coming together to replace an obscure but controversial name with a more positive choice with the same last name. Seattle is in King County, Washington. King County was originally named for William King, a person later found unacceptable because he was a slave owner. In 1986, the County Council renamed the County to instead honor Martin Luther King Jr. This decision allowed the community to come together and turn the page in a unifying way. I believe it is an example we should consider.

    While Edward S. Bragg is one name that should be considered, I do not suggest that I alone should choose the new name of Fort Bragg any more than a Commission full of people who do not live in our community should. This needs to be a community decision, but we need to act quickly.

    According to the Commission’s timeline, we have until the middle of September before members release their initial report to the Secretary of Defense.

    I believe your voice and the voices of our community need to be heard. The local elected leaders in Cumberland and surrounding counties need to weigh in. We also need to hear from the Chamber of Commerce and our local veteran organizations.

    The Commission will soon have a website allowing people to submit comments directly about renaming. In the meantime, organizations and folks should engage with local elected leaders, community leaders, or contact my office through my website at Hudson.House.Gov and I will be happy to relay your opinions, letters or resolutions to the Commission on your behalf.

    Fort Bragg is going to be renamed whether we like it or not. If our community doesn’t come together with a consensus name, one will be chosen for us. I believe the consensus name that could unite us is Edward S. Bragg.

    Now it’s time for our local elected and community leaders to join this discussion and bring us together. I stand ready to help.

    Pictured above: Many are calling for Fort Bragg to be renamed Fort Bragg in honor of Union General Edward S. Bragg. (Photo courtesy Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division)

  • 12 Tim Hair with Indian OutlawThe Gates Four Summer Concert Series is back this month with the penultimate show of the 2021 season featuring Tim Hair with Indian Outlaw on Aug. 28 at the Pavilion.

    “We are a southern, high-energy band,” said Tim Hair, the front man of the group. “We want to get the crowd involved, we want them singing and dancing along.”

    The seven-member band includes: Tim Hair on lead vocals; Jeff Eisemann on drums; Kevin Freeman on violin, cello and mandolin; Gina Gerard on keyboard, flute and harp; Dale Nelson on acoustic guitar; John Parker on bass guitar; and Ken Pittman on electric guitar.

    The band has been together for about a year, but individual members have decades of experience performing and entertaining audiences.

    “Jeff and I have known each other for about 10 years,” said Hair. “Jeff knew the others.” The band came together with the intent of performing at fairs, festivals and doing theater shows. “We didn’t want to play clubs late at night anymore.”

    Eisemann focused on putting together the best performance band he could, picking talented musicians from across the state. Band members live from Sandford to New Bern but come together for rehearsals and live shows.

    Hair has been performing as a Tim McGraw tribute artist for about 18 years, but “I’ve always been singing,” he said.
    Hair sang in church growing up and performed in concert choir while attending the University of Mount Olive. Later he sang at weddings and then clubs.

    People told him he looked like Tim McGraw many times, so as a joke, he attended a McGraw concert in the late 90s wearing the singer’s typical fashion of jeans, cowboy boots, hat and T-shirt.

    “I was bombarded by people,” Hair said. Some thought McGraw was walking through the crowd, some wanted to get their picture taken with him. At one point a security detail surrounded him.

    Hair decided to enjoy the experience and, being a fan of McGraw, began doing tribute shows, even performing in Las Vegas as part of Matt Lewis’ Vegas ShoWorks Entertainment. He’s also had a few opportunities to perform with McGraw on stage in 2001 in Charlotte and in 2014 in Raleigh. Hair sang back-up vocals during a virtual concert McGraw performed last year during the pandemic.

    Once, Hair took part in a “magic trick” at a McGraw concert. At the beginning of the show, McGraw’s security people walked Hair through the crowd to the stage. “It was an illusion,” Hair said. While the audience focused on Hair, the real Tim McGraw was hidden in the crowd to be revealed as a surprise when McGraw came out of hiding and started singing.

    Although he won’t be hiding anywhere at Gates Four, Hair said that is the kind of fun he and Indian Outlaw like to deliver to audiences.

    “The guys in the group are super excited to be playing [at Gates Four]. It is our first time here as a band,” Hair said. Hair has performed shows in the past at the Crown and at the Cumberland County Fair.

    “We come to have a great time and put on a good show,” he said.

    Indian Outlaw will perform three sets. The first two are a Tim McGraw tribute. “We perform his hits from the early days up through ‘Humble and Kind’ and a couple off his new album,” Hair said.

    “The third set is other fun songs, more southern rock,” he said. That set list includes songs to get the audience singing along such as “Keep Your Hands to Yourself,” “Sharp Dressed Man” and “Chicken Fried.”

    Tickets for Stylin Country: Tim Hair with Indian Outlaw are available for purchase online at www.fayettevilledinnertheatre.com. Tickets include dinner and the concert with lawn seating (bring your chair). For VIP tables, group rates or more information, call 910-391-3859.

    Gates open at 5:30 p.m. and the meal is served from 6 to 7:30 p.m. The concert is scheduled from 7 to 10 p.m. There will also be a complete line of beverages available at full-service cash bars. Concierge table service will be provided for VIP tables inside the Gates Four Pavilion.

    The Gates Four Summer Concert Series is sponsored by realtor Jay Dowdy of All American Homes, Piedmont Natural Gas, Up & Coming Weekly, Healy Wholesale and Gates Four Golf & Country Club.

    For more information about Tim Hair and Indian Outlaw visit the Facebook page at www.facebook.com/groups/107438679278378.

     

  • 15 woman thinking I was born to a mother whose lack of ability to see led her to be raised as blind.

    She went to a school for the blind, read braille, listened to audio books long before they were trendy or commonplace, and was the picture of tenacity and strength in my youth.

    And though she was technically blind, as science and technology advanced, she was eventually able to see well enough to sew for family and friends and became a talented quilter in her latter years.

    Her spirit of pushing through adversity was a norm for me, and honestly could not have prepared me better for the decades that were ahead of me.

    I've been honored to live shoulder to shoulder with a woman as strong or stronger than anyone I've ever known – my wife.

    Born with a club foot deformity, Dorothy's parents knew her strength early on. Though she endured multiple surgeries, was relegated to braces and formative footwear for much of her early life, she chose to be an achiever over a victim of circumstance.

    Her ability to ever walk was in question when she started school, but she never relented in her pursuit of a full life, to the point of even becoming a cheerleader in high school.

    The Bible makes much of strong women. In Proverbs 31:16-17 it says, "She considers a field and buys it; with the fruit of her hands she plants a vineyard. She dresses herself with strength and makes her arms strong."

    That passage offers a clear view of the woman I've walked and worked with for more than 40 years. In all honesty, it can feel simultaneously like both a blessing and a curse to yoke yourself with someone willing to tackle problems head on, and never stop at the point of 'good enough.'

    In the final equation however, it's admirable. The tenacity it took to literally climb the stairs in a leg brace as a child has been applied to one adverse situation after another, virtually turning what might seem like dead ends to some into mere obstacles on the course for Dorothy.

    From incredibly humble beginnings, her unwillingness to stop at any level of mediocrity has led her to rise from retail clerk to multi-store buyer, and from administrative assistant to company owner. All the while raising children and grandchildren and leaving no stone unturned in her quest for the very best she can offer.

    Dorothy DeBruler is currently one of the owners of Grander Vision Media, the company which operates local Christian radio station WCLN-FM.

    Her day-to-day efforts enable the life transforming message of the Gospel of Jesus Christ to reach thousands of daily listeners through radio and several digital platforms.

     

     

  • 14 headshotShari Fiveash moved to Fayetteville earlier this year to start her new role as the President and CEO of the Greater Fayetteville Chamber.

    “I am new in this role in Fayetteville, but I have done nonprofit management for chambers and associations for a little over 30 years now,” she said.

    After earning a bachelor’s degree in Design at the University of Missouri in Columbia, Fiveash spent her career in roles with multiple chambers, economic development, nonprofits, visitor bureaus, association in management positions and event hotel management.

    “A design degree you wouldn’t have thought would work but has worked very well in my position,” she said. “I have helped design a welcome center in Missouri, I was the lead contractor for a remodel of a chamber in Kentucky, so I have used my degree but just not straight up, and you never know what's going to lead you to what you
    really like.”

    Since moving to North Carolina from Connecticut, Fiveash has been taking on her role as Chamber president with enthusiasm and a respect for local organizations and businesses.

    “Once you get into it, you kind of get a passion for that nonprofit and hospitality and kind of do that service thing,” Fiveash said.

    “It’s kind of addictive, you get attached to it because you enjoy working with people and the opportunity to meet new people and not doing the same thing every day.”

    Originally Fiveash had looked at job opportunities in Georgia and South Carolina which weren’t the exact fit and wasn’t sure of the position in Fayetteville, before she met the people and that’s what sold her on being here, she mentioned.

    “It was just a really nice group of people I spoke with, it was just the right situation,” Fiveash said.

    The Greater Fayetteville Chamber acts as the catalyst in growing a healthy business community through advocacy of business-friendly public policy, fostering of diverse innovative business initiatives, delivering valuable programs and services to the community.

    The Chamber’s origins can be traced back to 1899 and has functioned under various names for 100 years.

    “This Chamber is coming out of COVID just like a lot of businesses, we were down staffed, and we took a hit just like everyone else did so we are picking up the pieces and coming back together and trying to regroup so I am doing a lot of jobs that I might not normally be doing,” she said. “We are trying to grow back and open up and do all kinds of things.”

    Due to those reasons, Fiveash said she’s currently wearing lots of hats that she wouldn’t normally have on and there’s no average day for her as they are still rebuilding.

    Her day involves a lot of answering questions and reaching out to people, a lot of operations and marketing, she said.

    “So everything’s changed a little bit due to COVID and we’re trying to bring everything back up and dust them off and change them up a little bit and make everything bigger and better,” Fiveash mentioned.

    After starting her position, she’s focused on regrouping and has helped celebrate the Army’s birthday, the business networking breakfast, coffee clubs and more.

    “The Chamber's main purpose is to help keep the economy strong in our community,” Fiveash said. “We help businesses grow, thrive, network with educational opportunities, resources and more so that they have the opportunity to prosper and help our community to do so also.”

    Her main job function is working for the directors of the chamber, by taking their vision and applying her experience to help craft it and lead the business community in the right direction, she mentioned.

    The Great Fayetteville Chamber belongs to the state and national chamber, and has a government committee that does lobbying and stays aware of the different things on different levels for businesses and the community. The Chamber also helps the community take up leadership positions in local government.

    “Right now there’s a lot of open positions on different committees in the city, county, and so we have a program called Leadership Fayetteville where we try to educate people and encourage them to not so much be political figures but to give up their time, talent and service to our community,” Fiveash said.

    A part of her vision as the new president and CEO of the chamber is to implement new programs.

    “One of the things I discussed with the government relations group is Washington Fly-In, where you go see many legislators in D.C. which I think have a viable impact and value,” Fiveash said. “Another program I would like to see happen here is where we teach kids to make business plans, a joint effort with the school system and small businesses.”

    She wants to see young entrepreneurs grow and teach them the value of staying in the community.

    “We’ve got some great colleges and teaching kids there is great opportunity here and continue to grow our community with some young entrepreneurs, keep growing our economy that would be very valuable,” she mentioned.

    In her free time, Fiveash says she enjoys the beach, loves a good bargain, estate sales and auctions as well as drawing and painting which she hopes to get back into as time permits. She is also a Rotarian.

    Every one of her past roles have been different from each other, but all focus on service and helping the community stay prosperous and grow, she says.

    “I would say seeing a community grow and blossom is what inspires me,” Fiveash added. “This community is growing and changing, it's just on the cusp, it could be so much more and I think that potential is there, but they just need a little push and a nudge over the edge to make some big leaps.”

    Pictured above: Shari Fiveash is the President and CEO of the Greater Fayetteville Chamber.

  • 10 IMG 4842Linda Carnes-McNaughton has spent her career as an archaeologist and works as such on Fort Bragg. “I discovered anthropology, the study of human cultures, biology and behaviors.

    It seemed like a perfect fit, then I went on ‘a dig’ and knew that was what I wanted to do forever, I wanted to learn about people of the past through discovery.”

    As a military brat, Carnes-McNaughton was immersed in other cultures as a child when the family moved around. In Japan, at the age of 6, she took language classes, traditional dance and crafts and enjoyed the games she played with Japanese children.

    “I think that experience, that exposure, that immersion into another culture at such a young age, planted the seed of anthropology in my head.”

    In her current work, Carnes-McNaughton said archaeologists are able to engage with folks who have direct connections to this land as well as others who want to know more about the people of the past.

    She goes on to say, “One of our current responsibilities is working with federally-recognized Indian Nations who once called the Sandhills their homelands. Building respectful long-term relationships with these heritage families enhances our understanding of this landscape and its vital natural resources.”
    “The term ‘heritage families’ refers to families whose ancestors we know from documentation and oral histories once lived on this landscape. Their ancestors could have been Native Americans, or early colonists or former enslaved Africans who lived here, raised families here and may have died here, and are buried in one of our 26 early historic cemeteries. The work we do in discovering people of the past is greatly enhanced by the families’ histories shared by descendants. Often, we can share what we learn about an old farm or house site with descendants and they will then share their knowledge with us.”

    At this point in her career, she has been on nearly 100 digs, most of those in the southeastern United States, but primarily in North Carolina.

    “Once I was fortunate enough to do a small survey in Northern Ireland on historic pottery manufacturing sites. Over the years, I worked as an archaeologist for university-sponsored field projects, private-consulting agencies, and state- and now, federal-government programs,” she said.

    “The sites ranged in age from prehistoric times to historic cultural periods; sites like 2000-year old soapstone quarry sites, to 19th century tar kilns, or early pottery kiln sites, to battlefield sites, home sites, colonial towns, prehistoric village sites, some cemeteries and even work on pirate shipwrecks.”

    Carnes-McNaughton co-authored the book “Blackbeard’s Sunken Treasure: The 300-year Voyage of Queen Anne’s Revenge,” with Mark U. Wilde-Ramsing. She really enjoyed working on the project. “I specialize in material culture studies (the artifacts – how they are made, what they date to, what they are used for, how they get recycled and who used them).”

    She began as a volunteer on the shipwreck project looking at the pottery and glass recovered on this 1718 site. Then, the work expanded into examining items of personal gear such as items of clothing, smoking pipes, ornamentation like beads and buttons, buckles, etc., as well as navigational equipment, and then cooking or galley artifacts and finally into the realm of maritime medicines such as looking at medical equipment found on the wreck.

    “All this research led to a better understanding of who is represented by the artifacts, leaning more about activities that took place and how the remains of the wreck ended up on the ocean floor,” Carnes-McNaughton said. “My co-author was the former QAR project director, an underwater and we realized that between us we made a great team to document what has been found on this important shipwreck. I enjoy this research as much as I enjoy pottery research.”

    Working outdoors has always appealed to Carnes-McNaughton and excavation has always been her preferred avenue of discovery. She enjoys the fieldwork the most but also enjoys interaction with the people (descendants and others) who have a vested interest in the history of the Sandhills and pre-Fort Bragg landscape. She also likes starting a conversation by sharing a single artifact and talking about what it means to different people. That is oftentimes very intriguing.

    “If I had to pick one single site that was a life-changing experience it was helping to excavate the oldest European-style pottery kiln found in North America, the 1566 kiln at the Spanish fort site of Santa Elena on Parris Island, South Carolina.” said Carnes-McNaughton. “That was sheer delight.”

    Carnes-McNaughton encourages others to explore the field in which she has found a rewarding career.

    “Archaeology is important science in that it helps us look at the past in order to understand the present and future of our place on this planet. Being an archaeologist means looking at the world around us in a different perspective. We learn to be humanists at the same time we practice our science.”

    Pictured above: Linda Carnes-McNaughton is an archaeologist on Fort Bragg. (Photos courtesy Fort Bragg Garrison PAO)

  • 09 Peace Easton 1400x1484Coaches play a pivotal role in the lives of their players and they carry the huge responsibility of having to develop them as individuals and athletes. Peace Shepard Easton is qualified, willing, and more than ready for this responsibility and challenge as the new coach for Fayetteville Tech’s women’s basketball.

    Her extensive background began with her start in playing recreational basketball in her elementary years. During her middle and high school years, she played basketball, ran track and participated in volleyball. Volleyball was one of her top sports and she was also good in track and field with the triple jump, high jump, long jump and 4x400 relay.

    Easton excelled in all three sports and graduated from Swansboro High School in 1993. She attended basketball camps and was recruited by several colleges in the ACC.

    Easton attended N. C. State where she played for Coach Kay Yow. In her senior year, Eaton helped the Wolfpack make it to the NCAA Final Four. She also played professional basketball after college overseas in Italy, Brazil, Honduras, Ecuador, Finland and Greece.

    Her awards include Coach of the Year, Hall of Fame inductee, MVP, numerous state championships, state playoffs and more. Easton was previously the coach of Holly Springs High School for seven years. While there, Easton racked up 100 wins and earned conference coach of the year honors three times and lead the program to four conference chanpionships and five state playoffs.

    With having the substantial experience of more than thirty-something years of coaching and playing basketball FTCC Athletic Director Dr. Shannon Yates gave Easton the opportunity to lead the Trojans.

    “I am looking forward to being their influencer, coach, big sister and mentor,” said Easton.

    “By having been a high school student, a college basketball player, a professional basketball player, and a coach, I don’t have all the answers, but I can at least guide the ladies in the right direction to do the right thing because I have been through it.”

    She added, “I understand the struggles of being a high school basketball player from a small town trying to be noticed.”

    Easton had a life changing experience during her childhood.

    “My father had a stroke when I was in the 8th grade so I was living in a home where my mom took care of my dad,” said Easton. “He is paralyzed on his right side, can’t talk, and nothing has changed besides he has gotten older and has become more dependent on my mom who has been the best wife that any husband could actually have.”

    "People didn’t know that I have always assisted her in the background and a lot of people did not know that I had all of this going on in the spotlight with basketball,” said Easton.

    “They never knew that I was coming home to a mother who was taking care of my father, showed me how to make lemons out of lemonade, and she is my biggest influencer.”

    Coach Easton earned a bachelor's degree in sociology and spends time working in health services.

    “At the moment I have worked for five years with UNC and I have been working with Medicare claims,” said Easton.

    “So basically I assist providers as far as getting their claims paid in regards to if it is going to be covered by Medicare, the patient, or hospice.”

    Easton added that she has been in health care since she graduated from high school and started out at Sigma.

    Coach Easton has great plans for Fayetteville Technical Community College’s Women’s basketball team.

    “I just want to make a difference as far as trying to get kids to the next step and using my background, connections and networks that I have created in the past,” said Easton.

    “I made a lot of relationships and I want to take advantage of that because there are a lot of people that I know who are college coaches in any realm of Division I, II and III.”

    She added, “I want to take those relationships and help make the lives better for my athletes.”

    When asked what is the one thing that people would be surprised to know about her, she responded, “They would be surprised to know that I am very shy and I don’t like public speaking or being in the spotlight, but there is something about when I get on the court and start coaching, it just leaves me,” said Easton. “There is no fear at all and I am in my element at that time, but I like for someone else to do the speaking and I will tell them thanks for doing a great job.”

    As far as beginning her first season at FTCC, Easton was quick to share her thoughts: “I am very proud and excited to be given the opportunity in the college world to coach,” said Easton. “It has always been a dream of mine.”

    Pictured above: Peace Shepard Easton brings decades of experience to her role as head coach of FTCC's women's basketball. (Photos courtesy Fayetteville Technical Community College)

     

  • 05 hurricane imageHurricanes are dangerous and can cause major inland damage because of high wind, heavy rain, flooding and tornadoes. A tornado is a violently rotating column of air extending from the base of a thunderstorm down to the ground.

    Tornadoes can occur at any time of day or night and at any time of the year. They are most common in the southeastern states and the central plains. In recent history the month of September has been the most active period for Atlantic storms. Hurricanes Matthew and Florence impacted the greater Fayetteville area causing severe flood damage.

    Households should have emergency plans and provisions in the event of lengthy power outages. Cell phones should be kept charged, and when you know a hurricane is in the forecast purchase backup charging devices to power electronics.

    Plan, prepare and be ready for emergencies with The Public Works Commission’s 2021 Storm Preparation Guide. Request a copy of the guide at PWC’s website www.faypwc.com. Copies of the Guides are also available at Up & Coming Weekly stands in Fayetteville and Cumberland County.

  • 07 Fayetteville Highway LitterThe N.C. Department of Transportation needs volunteers to help clean up roadside trash along during the Adopt-A-Highway Fall Litter Sweep from Sept. 11-25.

    Each April and September, NCDOT asks volunteers to help remove litter from street sides. Volunteers from local businesses, schools, nonprofits, churches, municipalities, law enforcement and community groups play an important role in keeping North Carolina’s roads clean. Joining this effort is easier than ever before as volunteers can now sign up by way of a convenient online form.

    “The litter sweep is a great opportunity to get outdoors with family and friends and work alongside NCDOT to ensure North Carolina remains a beautiful place to live and work.”

    Volunteers can request supplies such as trash bags, gloves, and safety vests from local NCDOT county maintenance offices. Anyone who has been recently diagnosed with or exposed to COVID-19 should refrain from participating. For more information visit www.ncdot.gov/or call 919-707-2970.

  • 04 Field of HonorThe Airborne & Special Operations Museum Foundation says there is a limited number of Field of Honor flags left for purchase at $45 each.

    Each flag comes with its own story and displays a tag identifying the person who sponsored the flag and the honoree.

    This living display of heroism flies as a patriotic tribute to the strength and unity of Americans and honors all who are currently serving, those who have served, and the men and women who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our nation’s freedom.

    The Field of Honor will be displayed on the Museum's Parade Field Sept. 11 through Nov. 14.

  • 08 N1211P12003HSome active duty soldiers and veterans are being “grossly” overcharged for VA home loans, and federal regulators need to suspend or ban alleged bad actors and strengthen their oversight over lenders, according to a new report from the office of Rep. Katie Porter, D-Calif.

    The report alleges that NewDay USA and The Federal Savings Bank are aggressively refinancing loans with fees and interest rates that could cost borrowers tens of thousands of dollars more over the life of the loans compared to other lenders.

    “It is despicable that corporate executives would prey on veterans and military families to line their pockets,” said Porter in an announcement of the report, titled “AWOL: How watchdogs are failing to protect servicemembers from financial scams.”

    The report “calls out the lenders that are continuing to single out vulnerable military borrowers for overpriced, cash-out refi mortgages.

  • 03 opioid crisisThe Cumberland County Department of Public Health began distributing naloxone Aug. 10 after receiving funding approval from the County Commissioners and Alliance Health. Naloxone, commonly known as NARCAN, is a lifesaving medication that is used to reverse an opioid overdose. It works by blocking the effects of the opioids in the person’s system, reversing the overdose. Naloxone can be given nasally or injected into the muscle.

    The distribution of naloxone is to benefit those who are at risk of a potential opioid overdose. Individuals can pick up a kit if they have friends, family or a loved one who are at risk of an opioid overdose or for people who want to help if they see someone having an opioid overdose. Everyone qualifies to pick up naloxone from the Health Department.

    Naloxone kits are available at the CCDPH Pharmacy located on the first floor at 1235 Ramsey St., Fayetteville and will be available at no charge while supplies last. Pharmacy hours are Monday –Thursday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. and Friday 8:30 a.m. – noon. The pharmacy is closed for lunch from 12-1 p.m.

    For more information if you or someone you know is struggling with opioid addiction, please seek help by visiting allianceforaction.org or calling Alliance Health at 800-510-9132.

  • 02 KearneyThe city of Fayetteville was going to host a virtual town hall this month on a proposal to update the city’s code of ordinances. But officials changed their minds at the request of city council member D.J. Haire.

    Haire is concerned that proposed changes to Article 30 of Fayetteville’s Unified Development ordinance are not thorough. The planned change would strengthen regulations governing so-called halfway houses. The city’s planning commission, which has initial jurisdiction, was to have held the town hall and was asked to postpone it.

    Of special interest to city council is a plan by DISMAS Charities Inc., of Louisville, Kentucky, to build a 14,339 square foot, 100-bed halfway house for federal prisoners at 901-905 Cain Road. DISMAS Charities is a private company contracted by the Federal Bureau of Prisons to operate residential reentry centers. The BOP has the authority to place inmates in reentry halfway houses to serve the remainder of their sentences which it says is normally six months to a year. If built as proposed, the Cain Road institution would be the company’s largest center. The 36 establishments operated nationwide by DISMAS Charities average 25 inmates.

    The company’s interest in constructing such a large facility could be to compensate for the reduction and/or cancellation of federal halfway houses which began in the summer of 2017. Sixteen federal facilities previously under contract with the BOP were closed. The goal is to provide prisoners with programs to help them successfully transition back into society. Programming can include work, education, vocational training, drug and mental health treatment as well as custodial release preparation.

    The property on Cain Road abuts the Scotty Hills / Shamrock neighborhood. Residents fear an institution for housing federal prisoners would negatively impact surrounding property values and create a safety issue. In February of 2020, by a vote of 5-4, city council denied DISMAS a special use permit which would have allowed the company to build the halfway house. The firm appealed, and on Sept. 3 Superior Court Judge Mary Ann Tally affirmed city council’s decision. It is now before the North Carolina Court of Appeals.

    The proposal under consideration by city government is to abandon the term halfway house and establish ‘community reintegration centers.’ Revised ordinance amendments would limit the number of residents allowed in future centers. If a community reintegration center is located within 500 feet of a single-family residential zoning district the number of residents shall not exceed 30 people. If located within 500 feet of a multi-family residential district, the number of residents shall not exceed 40 people. The distance would be measured from the property line of the community reintegration center to the property line of the nearest residential property.

    Reintegration centers are defined as treatment complexes rather than housing units. Zoning districts where they would be allowed would be reduced, effectively barring them in or near housing areas. On June 15, the planning commission reviewed the proposed ordinance amendments and voted unanimously to recommend their adoption. Once a rescheduled virtual town hall is held, the commission will consider the application, relevant support materials, the staff report and comments given by the public.

    Pictured above: This file photo shows a DISMAS reentry center in Kearney, Nebraska. (Photo courtesy www.dismas.com)

     

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