High School Highlights

Emergency plans have players, spectators in mind

20 toolsA Friday night high school football stadium packed with fans watching two teams battle has the potential for disaster if bad weather should suddenly develop.

 
Fortunately for fans at North Carolina High School Athletic Association events, procedures are in place to make sure there is a coordinated plan for getting athletes and spectators to safety.
 
The NCHSAA has something called the Pregame Emergency Action Plan Report. It’s put together by the athletic trainer for the home team and provides an assortment of critical information to help guide game personnel through the needed steps to ensure everyone’s safety.
 
Sheri Squire, who has been an athletic trainer at Terry Sanford for the past seven years, said the report is designed to provide specific information about the location where the game is being played that can be shared with both the visiting team and the officials who are calling the game.
 
 
“It’s basically so we know exactly what’s going on at that site during that event so we have an emergency plan in place,’’ Squire said.
 
Emergency plans are typically posted at schools, but this one is more specific since it deals with the exact venue of the athletic event and is shared in person with those who need the information.
 
The report includes contact information for the game-day administrator, the athletic trainers or first responders of both teams along with the name of the head of the officiating crew and the names of any medical personnel who might be attending the game.
 
For outdoor events, there is additional information on where the safe shelter is located and what the route to get there is.

 

A name is also provided for the person who is monitoring weather conditions, including lightning and the wet bulb temperature, which determines whether it’s too hot for play to continue.

Squire uses a handheld device called a Kestrel Heat Stress Tracker to find the wet bulb temperature before the game starts and record it on the form. If it’s 88.9 degrees at kickoff special precautions have to be taken. If it’s 92 or above, the game may have to be stopped or suspended until it gets cooler.

 
A lightning detector is usually monitored by the game administrator or someone else to make sure the stadium is cleared before lightning gets too close to the field to strike someone.
 
In addition to the form, Squire and other athletic trainers have a badge provided by the NCHSAA that includes a checklist for things to watch out for at all events and especially outdoor events.
 
“I like the fact it’s all in one place,’’ Squire said. “You ask the important questions. Now it’s going to make everybody be on the same page. It helps you keep your I’s dotted and T’s crossed.’’
 

Pictured: A copy of the pregame emergency report rests beneath the Kestrel heat stress device and the NCHSAA pre-game checklist badge. 

 

Britt keeping 3-0 start in perspective

19 BrittThroughout the preseason, Jack Britt head football coach Brian Randolph has preached a two-word motto to his team.

 
Restore order.
 
To Randolph, the message to players and coaches alike is for everyone associated with the Buccaneers to be on the same track and in the same frame of mind of being from Jack Britt, a place people respect and a team that other schools don’t want to face.
 
“They know when they play us, it’s going to be a tough match,’’ Randolph said. “It’s not going to be an easy game. It’s something you have to prepare for and work for in order to get a victory.’’
 
As the Buccaneers headed into their open date last week, they were sporting a 3-0 record, all three wins coming against the top three teams in last year’s Patriot Athletic Conference standings: champion Pine Forest and runners up South View and Terry Sanford.
 
Randolph said in all honesty, he didn’t see his team going 3-0, but he knew it was possible and he’s happy to be here.
 
One of the biggest reasons for the Buccaneers’ early success is the passing combination of quarterback Kevin Sentell and wide receiver Anthony Fiffie.
 
Through three games, Sentell leads the Cumberland County Schools with 564 passing yards and eight touchdowns. He’s completed 39 of 66 passes with only two interceptions.
 
Fiffie is the leading receiver with 15 receptions for 303 yards and five scores.
 
During a film session last week, Randolph told him Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Rothlisberger will be in the Pro Football Hall of Fame one day because of his ability to extend plays.
 
Randolph said Sentell has the same skill. “It’s really hard to guard someone for six or seven seconds,’’ Randolph said. “That’s what Kevin Does really well. He gets his feet separated, keeps his eyes down the field, just looking for that big play.’’
 
Randolph added that Sentell is smart and makes plays instead of mistakes.
 
For his part, Randolph said Fiffie is a great route-runner with excellent body control who seems to be able to slow things down when the ball is near him so he can focus on making the catch.
 
“He does a great job of embracing contact,’’ Randolph said. “He’s not the fastest guy in the world, but if you get close to him, he’s able to position his body in a way that if the ball is near him he’s going to catch it or make a good play on it.’’
 
Sentell said he and Fiffie have excellent chemistry and have been working together for five years.
 
“He runs great routes and gets open most of the time,’’ Sentell said. “It makes my job easy.’’
 
Fiffie said he’s playing with more confidence this year and has greater confidence in his teammates.
 
He credits much of his success with Sentell to the numerous offseason workouts they’ve had.
 
“We practice working on routes, catching the ball and getting our timing down,’’ Fiffie said. “I believe we caught people off guard, really turned their heads.’’
 
While Britt’s recent return to winning may be something new to the current players in the program, Randolph has vivid memories of getting off to fast starts during his days playing for Bob Paroli and Mike Paroli at Douglas Byrd High School.
 
That’s helped him take a measured look at what Britt’s 3-0 record means as he reflects on lessons learned from the Parolis.
 
“It’s one game at a time, one play at a time,’’ he said. “You think you’ve arrived somewhere and that’s when you set yourself up.’’
 
Bob Paroli had a favorite saying about that. He called it dropping your candy in the sand.
 
“We have our candy in our hand right now,’’ Randolph said, “but we could easily drop it in the sand and mess up everything we worked for so far.
 
“This off week we’re going to work on fundamentals and getting back to basics. Just focus on one play at a time.’’
 
Pictured from L-R: Anthony Fiffie, Kevin Sentell

Earl’s predictions for 9/13/19

The first Associated Press state high school football rankings came out earlier this week. The news was not good for Cumberland County. With potential to have teams ranked in either the 4-A or 3-A polls, not one team from the county got a mention, not even in the teams receiving votes category. Our best candidates for ranking were the 3-0 teams, Gray’s Creek in 3-A and Jack Britt and Seventy-First in 4-A. Not a vote for any of them.
 
There were some Cape Fear region teams mentioned. In 4-A, Richmond Senior, coached by former Terry Sanford and Cape Fear coach Bryan Till, is No. 3 and got two first-place votes.
Former Jack Britt coach Richard Bailey has his Scotland team ranked sixth. Lee County, which has already handed losses to E.E. Smith and Douglas Byrd, is No. 6 in the 3-A poll.
Clinton, which had its game with Cape Fear canceled the first week of the season, is No. 8 in 2-A. 
 
Rankings of course mean absolutely nothing when it comes to determining state playoff berths or state champions, but they are a valuable barometer of how the rest of the state feels about the status of football in your area.
 
We’ll keep watching as the weeks pass and see if any of our teams get some love.
 
 
 
The record: 18-5
 
I had my best week of the young season, going 7-1 to improve the total for the year to 18-5, 78.2 percent.
Now let’s brace for a scary batch of projections for this Friday the 13th.
 
 
Douglas Byrd at Westover - This is one of those dreaded coin flip games. I’ll give Westover a slight edge because they’re playing at home.
Westover 18, Douglas Byrd 16.
 
Terry Sanford at E.E. Smith - Coming off a loss to Jack Britt and an open date, look for Terry Sanford to make a point in this annual battle of old city rivals.
Terry Sanford 28, E.E. Smith 12.
 
Gray’s Creek at South View - Another coin flip game. I’m leaning toward South View for a couple of reasons. The Tigers have played a tougher schedule than the Bears and I think their offense is more balanced. Home field also counts for something in this annual Battle for the Bridge.
South View 20, Gray’s Creek 18.
 
Overhills at Pine Forest - I know Overhills is unbeaten, but I have a hard time seeing Pine Forest lose three in a row. This is the Trojans’ first Patriot Athletic Conference game, so I expect D.J. Jones back in the lineup after being held out as a precaution for the last two weeks. 
Pine Forest 20, Overhills 13.
 
Southern Durham at Seventy-First - This is Seventy-First’s final non conference game before an open date and the start of Sandhills Athletic Conference play at Pinecrest. It’s important for the Falcons not to get complacent after a 3-0 start to the season.
Seventy-First 21, Southern Durham 14.
 
Open dates - Cape Fear, Jack Britt.
 
Other games: Trinity Christian 30, Harrells Christian 8; Grace Christian 20, Fayetteville Christian 12.

Poor parent behavior a major problem for high schools

18 RefInappropriate adult behavior at high school athletic events throughout the country has reached epidemic proportions.

 
When more than 2,000 high school athletic directors were asked in a recent national survey what they like least about their job, 62.3% said it was “dealing with aggressive parents and adult fans.”
 
And the men and women who wear the black and white stripes agree. In fact, almost 80% of officials quit after the first two years on the job and unruly parents are cited as the reason why. As a result, there is a growing shortage of high school officials nationwide, and in some sports like wrestling, swimming, and track and field, the shortage is severe. No officials means no more games.
 
If you are a parent attending a high school athletic event this fall, you can help by following these six guidelines.
 
Act your age. You are, after all, an adult. Act in a way that makes your family and school proud.
 
Don’t live your life vicariously through your children. High school sports are for them, not you. Your family’s reputation is not determined by how well your children perform on the field of play.
 
Let your children talk to the coach instead of you doing it for them. High school athletes learn how to become more confident, independent and capable—but only when their parents don’t jump in and solve their problems for them.
 
Stay in your own lane. No coaching or officiating from the sidelines. Your role is to be a responsible, supportive parent — not a coach or official.
 
Remember, participating in a high school sport is not about getting a college scholarship. According to the NCAA, only about two percent of all high school athletes are awarded a sports scholarship, and the total value of the scholarship is only about $18,000.
 
Make sure your children know you love watching them play. Do not critique your child’s performance on the car ride home. Participating in high school sports is about character development, learning and having fun — not winning and losing.
 
Purchasing a ticket to a high school athletic event does not give you the right to be rude, disrespectful or verbally abusive. Cheer loud and be proud, but be responsible and respectful. The future of high school sports in our nation is dependent on you.

Brady hopes to continue Bulldog tennis tradition

19 01 Susan BradySusan Brady is in her first year as girls tennis coach at Terry Sanford High School. Even though she hasn’t been there long, she appreciates the school’s rich tradition in the sport, with multiple singles, doubles and state team champions.

“There’s always  pressure,’’ said Brady, a veteran of United States Tennis Association league play through Highland Country Club where she’s competed for state titles and beyond over the last 12 years.

But her biggest concern is making sure she can handle the basics of coaching with this team when it’s needed, teaching players who need structure or help with groundstrokes or other shots.

Fortunately for Brady this team is pretty sound fundamentally, as it earned the No. 7 ranking statewide in the North Carolina High School Tennis Coaches Association first 3-A poll of the season.

Playing No. 1 singles is senior Katy Beasley, who is also a captain. Brady calls her steady and a motivator for her teammates. “One of the things I love about her is she doesn’t give up,’’ Brady said. “She digs deep no matter what. She has this fight in her that’s essential on the court.’’

Beasley feels her strong points are a slice that catches a lot of her opponents off guard and her ability to move her opponents around the court. As for her being labeled a fighter on the court, Beasley thinks that comes from her refusal to accept a match is ever over. “You can turn it around at any point,’’ she said. “I think that’s a good part of how I play. I play for the point rather than the whole match.’’

19 02 Katy BeasleyAt No. 2 singles is MaryAnna Stiles, a sophomore. While Brady called Stiles one of the sweetest young women she’s ever met, she said she brings an intimidating game face to the court and never loses her cool. “She’s incredibly consistent and fun to watch,’’ Brady said.

No. 3 is Lauren McDonough. McDonough’s game is marked by great groundstrokes and good placement. “She is a good tennis thinker,’’ Brady said. “I can see her setting up shots. Her goal is she wants to win her match and be the first one off the court.’’

The No. 4 player is Caroline Beasley. Brady calls her the life of the tennis party with her bubbly personality. “She keeps us laughing and on our toes,’’ Brady said. But on the court, Beasley takes no prisoners, Brady said. “Her groundstrokes are some of the hardest I’ve ever seen,’’ she said. 

At No. 5 singles is Emily Stone. Brady said you can tell from watching Stone she played tennis from a young age. “Her strokes are great and she’s very solid,’’ Brady said. “She brings a lot to the court.’’

The Bulldogs are 3-0 this season through Tuesday, Sept. 3. 

Pictured from top to bottom: Susan Brady, Katy Beasley

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