High School Highlights

It’s a good time to make the vultures impatient

15 01 billThere’s an old cartoon that shows a couple of vultures sitting on a branch, scanning the horizon for carrion to eat and finding nothing.

One vulture turns to the other and says, “To heck with patience, I’m going to kill something.’’

That sentiment isn’t too far off from the frustration high school coaches and athletes around North Carolina and the Cape Fear region are feeling as they wait for the COVID-19 restrictions to be lifted so they can return to practice.

The North Carolina High School Athletic Association finally opened the door to the return to off-season workouts recently, using guidelines established both by the National Federation of State High School Associations and the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services.

15 02 vernon copyBut many of the state’s larger school systems, including Cumberland County, decided to hold off and delay the start of practice until Monday, July 6.

A conversation I had recently with Bill Sochovka, the dean of Cumberland County’s head football coaches, had me agreeing with the county’s plan to wait.

Sochovka had the same opinion, for a simple but solid reason. He wanted the county to take its time and see what happens at other schools that open up, examine what practices are in place, what works, what doesn’t and how to safely open the doors for the athletes and coaches in the safest manner possible.

Vernon Aldridge, the student activities director for the Cumberland County Schools, is also in the corner for caution, but for some different reasons. Aldridge wants to take time to make sure each of the county schools will have supplies on hand that they wouldn’t normally stock, things like hand sanitizer and other materials to make sure everyone stays as germ-free as possible.

With recent spikes in new cases since some COVID-19 restrictions were lifted, it’s clear everyone needs to take this illness seriously and continue to do everything possible to flatten the curve.

Nobody wants to see a return to practice and games more than I do. But I also don’t want to see an early return lacking proper precautions causing further spread of COVID-19.
Instead of copying the vultures, let’s adopt the philosophy of one of my favorite Clint Eastwood characters, Gunny Highway from the movie "Heartbreak Ridge." As Gunny Highway said, let’s improvise, adapt and overcome, and make practice and play as safe as it can possibly be.

Arrington tells Westover story in new book

14 bookFrom his high school days playing football for legendary coach Herman Boone to taking the disaster that was the Westover girls’ basketball team and turning it into a state champion, Gene Arrington enjoyed one of the most amazing athletic careers anyone could dream of.

Now, after listening to the urging of friends and family, he’s written a book about his experiences.

“Rise of the Wolverines: The Making of a Titan and Beyond’’ tells Arrington’s story from his days under Boone at T.C. Williams High School in Alexandria, Virginia, to his years turning the Westover girls basketball team into the best in the state. 

Arrington’s sister, Ethel Delores Arrington, actually did the writing, as Coach Arrington sat down with her and dictated the story of his life.
“My sister had written a book before and she got right in there with me,’’ Arrington said. 

When Arrington took over the Westover girls’ program, then Wolverine principal John Smith said everyone warned him it was a dead-end job and had the record to prove it.
At the time, the Wolverine girls were mired in an 87-game losing streak.

“Westover had been kind of labeled as a nonproductive type of school,’’ Arrington said. “I wanted them to know Westover could do anything any other school could do and win, and they did.’’

Arrington’s formula for success wasn’t anything complicated. “Confidence,’’ he said. “Those girls were confident they could beat anybody.’’

He said his guidance as a coach came largely from the legendary Boone, whose story was featured in the 2000 film “Remember the Titans,’’ starring Denzel Washington, which shared the story of Boone’s 1971 T.C. Williams team and the challenges he faced coaching at the height of public school integration.

“He was my mentor,’’ Arrington said. “He was my buddy. Most of the things I did were a mirror of him.’’

Boone, who died of lung cancer last December, wrote the foreword for Arrington’s book.

Arrington snapped the Westover girls’ losing skid in his first season there with a win over perennial Cumberland County girls’ basketball power Pine Forest. 

In his 15 seasons at Westover, Arrington only had three teams with losing records. From 2004-10, his teams won 20 or more games every season, winning or sharing the conference basketball title six times. Health reasons led him to retire before the 2013 season.

The Wolverines had their best season in 2008, when they went 30-2 and defeated West Charlotte 58-53 at N.C. State’s Reynolds Coliseum for the North Carolina High School Athletic Association 4-A girls’ basketball title. Along the way, they knocked off a 30-0 Raleigh Wakefield team in the semifinal round.

In the title game against West Charlotte, Arrington recalled taking a timeout with about five minutes to play and his team trailing by eight points.

Arrington said he usually did the talking during timeouts, but he recalled a moment reminiscent of one of the final scenes in the famed high school basketball movie “Hoosiers.”

Linda Aughburns, one of the stars of the state title team, looked at Arrington in that huddle and said to her coach, “We got this,’’ he recalled. 
 
In January of 2015, Westover paid tribute to Arrington’s outstanding career by naming the gym at the school in his honor.

Arrington said his hope for people who read the book is they will get a simple message from it. “I hope they’ll realize perseverance, building confidence, faith in each other and believing are the keys to success,’’ he said. 

The book is not available in stores. For information on purchasing it, go to www.coachgene.net. The cost is $17 plus $5 for shipping and handling. To 
place orders for multiple copies, email etheldelores@gmail.com.
 

Cumberland County athletes cleared for July 6 return

13 CumberlandCountySchoolsNEWlogoAthletes and coaches from the Cumberland County Schools will be allowed to begin off-season workouts effective Monday, July 6.

“We look forward to getting our student-athletes back on campus safely,’’ said county student activities director Vernon Aldridge in a press release last week. “The July 6 date is subject to change if state and local directives deem it necessary.’’

The decision was made following the announcement by the North Carolina High School Athletic Association that it was lifting the statewide hold on summer workout sessions and allowing schools to resume on June 15. However, the NCHSAA said it would be the right of each school system to announce if it would open June 15th date or wait until later.

Aldridge said workouts in the county will be held under guidelines released by the NCHSAA, as well as additional guidance from the Department of Health and
Human Services.

In the weeks prior to July 6, Aldridge said county schools will make sure they have the supplies and equipment required to insure safe practices, along with instruction for athletic staff on following the prescribed procedures.

By returning July 6, Cumberland County will miss the NCHSAA dead period normally held the week of July 4. A second dead period in July, the week of the annual East-West All-Star games, has been waived as the games and North Carolina Coaches Association Clinic this year have been canceled.

Athletes and parents must complete registration forms online using the "Final Forms" link that can be found on each school’s website in order for athletes to participate in summer workouts.

Any student with an athletic physical performed on or after March 1, 2019, will be considered eligible for 2020-21. Students who had a physical earlier than that date will be required to get a new one before attending workouts.

Assuming there are no other changes to the calendar, the July 6 date will give Cumberland County athletes four weeks of summer workouts before the official start of fall practice, which is still scheduled for Aug. 1.

Friends mourn passing of Pine Forest's Norton

12 jasonnortonJason Norton was remembered by his peers as someone who was easy to talk with, who wanted to win, but above all did everything for the benefit of the athletes at his school.

Norton, 47, who served as athletic director at Pine Forest since 2015, after an outstanding career as both an athlete and coach in his native Richmond County, died earlier this month after a lengthy battle with cancer.

He is survived by his wife, Lauren and sons Alex, Kevin and Jase.

Norton was an all-American placekicker at Catawba College, while playing for two state championship football teams at Richmond Senior and coaching a third.
He joined the staff at Pine Forest as athletic director in 2015, continuing to work there until the disease forced him to step down after the 2019 school year.

“He was very genuine,’’ said Pine Forest principal David Culbreth. “When he came to Cumberland County, he was excited to have the opportunity to be an administrator and an athletic director. It made everything easier with the enthusiasm and energy he brought.’’

“I don’t think you could have met a nicer, kinder person than Jason,’’ said Vernon Aldridge, student activities director for the Cumberland County Schools. “His ability to build relationships and be a good listener is what drew people to him.’’

Chad Barbour was the athletic director at South View when he first crossed paths with Norton and they became close friends. Barbour is now principal at Cumberland Polytechnic High School.

“He wanted the whole program to be successful and he wanted to get the best people in the positions he had,’’ Barbour said. “He had high expectations for the way students were supposed to conduct themselves.’’

One of Norton’s closest friends was David May, who coached with him at Hamlet Junior High School and was on the coaching staff at Pine Forest when Norton became athletic director.

“He’s worn so many hats in his life, coaching, teaching and being a father and a husband,’’ May said. “I can’t tell you how many people he’s taken to football camps all over the country with his boys that wouldn’t have had the opportunity to go.

“I know he’d be looking down right now amazed at all the love and support he’s receiving, how highly people thought of him. He wasn’t a vain type of guy who looked for praise.’’

During his battle with cancer, Norton received three major awards, including the Braveheart Award from the N.C. Athletic Directors Association, the Tony Simeon Courage Award from the N.C. High School Athletic Association and most recently the Stuart Scott Courage Award from HighSchoolOT.com.

State basketball co-champs headline county's shortened sports year

12 01 MatthewPembertonJust as Cumberland County was hoping to celebrate a pos-sible high point in mid-March with two state basketball champions, the high school athletic season across the state of North Carolina came to a crashing half because of restrictions imposed to pre-vent the spread of the COVID-19 virus.

Not only was the basketball season prevented from ending on the court, spring sports athletes saw their seasons end after just a week, and they were eventually canceled.

12 02 KylieAldridgeBut while the year may have ended abruptly for many county athletes, there were some who were able to com-plete their seasons. Here’s
a quick recap of the athletic year by season.

Fall
Football — South View and Terry Sanford finished with 7-1 conference records in the Patriot Athletic Conference with the Tigers winning the
head-to-head matchup on the field 23-17 in a game that went double overtime.

12 03 MiyaGilesJonesDorian Clark led the county in rushing with 2,346 yards. The top passer was Dashawn McCullough of E.E. Smith with 2,336 yards.

Volleyball — Gray’s Creek cruised to the Patriot Athletic Conference title with a 25-1 record, led by Kylie Aldridge and Kelsie Rouse with 77 and 70 aces respectively.

Boys soccer — Gray’s Creek edged Terry Sanford for the Patriot Athletic Conference title, finishing one game ahead of the Bulldogs in the league stan-12 04 DallasWilsondings. Eric Chavez was the leading scorer for the Bears with 17 goals and 14 assists.

Girls tennis — Cape Fear ended a 17-year losing streak to perennial county tennis power Terry Sanford, beating the Bulldogs 6-3. Terry Sanford wound up as the No. 1 seed in the state playoffs while Cape Fear earned a wildcard berth. Cape Fear reached the third round of the state 3-A playoffs, ended 14-2 after losing to unbeaten New Hanover.

The Colts were led by Brooke Bieniek and Paige Cameron.

Cross country — Octavious Smith of E.E. Smith was the top male runner in the county, winning the Patriot Athletic Conference meet with a time of 12 05 dmarcodunn16:09.10. Cape Fear, led by Jonathan Piland and Julius Ferguson, was the team winner for the boys.

For the girls, Terry Sanford’s Rainger Pratt won with a time of 20:21.90. The Bulldogs also took the team prize.

Girls golf — Toni Blackwell again led Cape Fear to the Patriot Athletic Conference title. She went on to win the 3-A East Regional tournament and placed third in the NCHSAA tournament. For the regular season, Blackwell averaged 77.9 per round. 

 

12 06 toniblackwellWinter

Basketball — Westover’s boys and E.E. Smith’s girls came within days of playing for state 3-A bas-ketball titles, only to have the restrictions put into place because of COVID-19 see their games first postponed and eventually canceled. The NCHSAA Board of Directors eventually decided to declare all of the teams that had advanced to this year’s state basketball finals cochampions.

The Westover boys were led by D’Marco Dunn, who averaged 20.8 points per game and has recei-ved numerous college scholarship offers.

Miya Giles-Jones was Smith’s leading scorer with 13.4 points per game.

Wrestling — South View edged Cape Fear for the Patriot Athletic Conference regular season honors, but the Colts brought home more state hardware. Dallas Wilson won his third consecutive state individual title for Cape Fear while teammate Nick Minacapelli won his first title after a third-place finish a year ago. Wilson was also named the Most Outstanding Wrestler at the state 3-A tournament.

Bowling — It was a banner year for local bow-ling as the Gray’s Creek boys and Terry Sanford girls captured state championships.

Junior Zoe Cannady helped pace Terry Sanford while on the boys’ side Terry Sanford’s Rolf Wallin won the boys’ state individual title.

The Gray’s Creek boys were led by regular sea-son MVP C.J. Woodle and Gio Garcia.

Swimming — Cape Fear’s boys and Terry Sanford’s girls were the top swim teams in the county. Among the top swimmers were Terry Sanford’s Allison Curl and Pine Forest’s Brandon Chhoeung.

Spring

Baseball — Gray’s Creek was off to a 5-0 start when the season ended. Ben Jones was batting .667.

Softball — Cape Fear was 6-0 and South View 3-0. The top three hitters were Kylie Aldridge of Gray’s Creek at .727, Morgan Nunnery of Cape Fear at .722 and Jaden Pone of Gray’s Creek at .714.

Girls soccer — Terry Sanford was off to a 4-0 start led by eight goals from Maiya Parrous and seven from Corrinne Shovlain.

Track, golf, tennis and lacrosse seasons were practi-cally wiped out by the COVID-19 restrictions.

Major Awards
Here is a list of all Cumberland County Schools athletes that received major individual awards from their conferences during 2019-20: Patriot Athletic Conference

Football 

Athlete of the Year —
Matthew Pemberton, South View
Offensive Player of the Year — Dorian Clark, Terry Sanford
Defensive Player of the Year — Jackson Deaver, Terry Sanford

Volleyball

MVP — Kylie Aldridge, Gray’s Creek

Boys Soccer

Offensive Player of the Year — Carlos Villarreal, Pine Forest

Defensive Player of the Year — Davis Molnar, Terry Sanford

Goal Keeper of the Year — Davin Schmidt, South View

Girls Tennis — Kelcie Farmer, Pine Forest Boys Cross Country — Octavious Smith, E.E. Smith
Girls Cross Country — Rainger Pratt, Terry Sanford

Girls Golf — Toni Blackwell, Cape Fear
Boys Basketball — D’Marco Dunn, Westover Girls Basketball — Faith Francis, Westover Wrestling — Dallas Wilson, Cape Fear
Boys Bowling — C.J. Woodle, Gray’s Creek Girls Bowling — Donna Kerechanin, South View Girls Swimming— Allison Curl, Terry Sanford Boys Swimming — Aiden Stockham and Brandon Chheoung, Pine Forest

Cheerleading — Avery Schenk, Terry Sanford Sandhills Athletic Conference

Swimming — Anna Miller, Jack Britt

From top to bottom: Matthew Pemberton, Kylie Aldridge, Miya Giles-Jones, Dallas Wilson, D'Marco Dunn, Toni Blackwell

Photo credit for Giles-Jones: Matthew Plyler/MaxPreps

 

 

 

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