Hope Mills News

Hope Mills Event Calendar

Meetings

For details about all meetings and activities, including location where not listed, call Town Clerk Jane Starling at 910-426-4113. Until the Parks and Recreation building has been repaired following damage from Hurricane Florence, some meetings may be moved to Luther Meeting Room at Town Hall at regular dates and times. Those meetings are noted with an asterisk below.

Appearance Committee Tuesday, Jan. 22, 6 p.m., Parks and Recreation Center*

Veterans Affairs Commission Thursday, Jan. 24, 7 p.m., Parks and Recreation Center*

Parks and Recreation Committee Monday, Jan. 28, 6:30 p.m., Parks and Recreation Center*

Board of Commissioners Monday, Feb. 4, 7 p.m., Luther Board Room, Town Hall

Historic Preservation Commission Wednesday, Feb. 13, Parks and Recreation Center*

Board of Commissioners Monday, Feb. 18, Luther Meeting Room, Town Hall*

Activities

For more information about these activities, contact Meghan Hawkins at 910-426-4109.

Martin Luther King Jr. Day Monday, Jan. 21— Town offices closed.

Hope Mills Area Kiwanis Club at Sammio’s, second Tuesdays at noon and fourth Tuesdays at 6 p.m. For details, call 910-237-1240.

Promote yourself

Email hopemills@upandcomingweekly.com.

Hope Mills to lower lake for work on separate projects

14 Hope Mills Lake The water level in Hope Mills Lake is not something town officials want to raise and lower with any kind of frequency. As Don Sisko, head of the town’s public works department, explained, it’s good structural practice to leave the lake at as constant a level as possible.

That’s why he suggested to town manager Melissa Adams that the level be lowered just once in the weeks ahead to deal with two situations at the lake. First, lowering the lake will give owners of property on the lake the annual opportunity to do maintenance to their piers and docks. Second, it will allow the town to install a planned bulkhead on the lake bank.

The actual date of the lowering of the lake won’t be determined until the town’s Board of Commissioners meets in late January and accepts a bid for work on the bulkhead and then establishes a date when that work will begin.

The town will then notify lakefront property owners about which dates to expect the lake to be lowered. When it is lowered, the property owners will be able to work on repairs for things that would normally be underwater.

Lowering the water level in winter also makes the lake healthier. The harsher weather kills exposed aquatic vegetation along the banks, including pond algae. A rapid increase of algae, or an algae bloom, can kill fish and remove oxygen from the water.

While the town has tentatively planned for the lake level to be lowered for about two weeks, Sisko said that is not an exact time frame. It will likely be longer than that, he said, because of the work required to install the bulkhead.

“The bulkhead is going to be installed on the opposite side of the boat ramp from the existing pier,’’ Sisko said.

“Part of its function will be to serve as an erosion control measure. Along with the bulkhead, we’re going to change the slope of that embankment. That will give us the opportunity to put in some backfill and make that a more gentle slope.’’

Sisko said the bulkhead will be made of specially treated wood, most likely pine.

The challenge for Sisko and the public works staff while the bulkhead is installed will be monitoring the lake level and making sure it stays low enough for the workers to operate in a dry environment.

“This is not an exact science,’’ Sisko said. “We’re not going to be able to keep the lake at a specific foot mark for any protracted period of time.’’

The biggest challenge will be monitoring rainfall after the lake is lowered and dealing with problems that will be caused if the rain is excessive, which could cause the lake to refill and force the opening of the sluice gates to drop the level further.

Sisko said people along the lake shouldn’t look for laborers to start work on the bulkhead until after bids are presented to the commissioners later this month.

Hope Mills Mayor Jackie Warner is hopeful the bulkhead installation process goes without complication so everything will be in place in plenty of time for this year’s annual lake festival in late May.

She doesn’t expect any problems regarding the homeowners and their repairs of their facilities since the water has been back in the lake for barely a year.

If anyone has questions about the lake lowering and installation of the bulkhead, they should contact the Hope Mills Public Works office at 910-423-2777.

Hope Mills Event Calendar

Meetings

For details about all meetings and activities, including location where not listed, call Town Clerk Jane Starling at 910-426-4113. Until the Parks and Recreation building has been repaired following damage from Hurricane Florence, some meetings may be moved to Luther Meeting Room at Town Hall at regular dates and times. Those meetings are noted with an asterisk below.

Appearance Committee Tuesday, Jan. 22, 6 p.m., Parks and Recreation Center*

Veterans Affairs Commission Thursday, Jan. 24, 7 p.m., Parks and Recreation Center*

Parks and Recreation Committee Monday, Jan. 28, 6:30 p.m., Parks and Recreation Center*

Board of Commissioners Monday, Feb. 4, 7 p.m., Luther Board Room, Town Hall

Historic Preservation Commission Wednesday, Feb. 13, Parks and Recreation Center*

Board of Commissioners Monday, Feb. 18, Luther Meeting Room, Town Hall*

Activities

For more information on these activities, contact Meghan Hawkins at 910-426-4109.

Martin Luther King Jr. Day Monday, Jan. 21 — Town offices closed.

Hope Mills Area Kiwanis Club at Sammio’s, second Tuesdays at noon and fourth Tuesdays at 6 p.m. For details, call 910-237-1240.

Promote yourself

Email hopemills@upandcomingweekly.com.

Building nightmare nearly over for Hope Mills recreation staff

13 Hope Mills flood

Editor's note: This story was written before the official announcement of temporary hours at the Hope Mills Recreation Center. Please see linked press release for temporary recreation center hours. 

  The nightmare is almost over for Maxey Dove and the staff of the Hope Mills Parks and Recreation Department.

After being forced out of their headquarters by Hurricane Florence in mid-February, Dove and his weary team are hopeful they’ll be back in place and running the town’s recreation program at full speed by early February.

As early as the final hours of Hurricane Florence, Dove and the recreation department staff were on the roof of the building using tar to patch numerous leaks. But those leaks proved to be the least of their worries.

Power went out to the recreation center the day after the storm hit. It wasn’t restored until the following Tuesday.

By that time, all the leaks and the water that got inside the building had created a gigantic mess.

Dove said there were no adequate words to describe just how bad it was inside the building by the time power was restored.

“It stayed wet for four or five days,’’ he said of the building’s interior. “You could see moisture on the walls and floors. We could not get it to dry.’’

That took a toll on a lot of things in the building. Dove estimated up to 80 percent of the building’s heating and air duct work had to be replaced, along with a large number of ceiling tiles and all of the building’s carpet.

It wasn’t until power was restored that huge fans could be brought in to circulate air and dry the walls and floors.

As many as four buckets of tar were used to patch leaks on the flat roof. The recreation staff recovered as many shingles as they could from around the building and put them back on the roof.

In addition to work from the staff, help with repairs came from a rescue group from Lincoln, Nebraska, and some federal emergency workers who came to Hope Mills.

Most of the athletic equipment stored in the building survived after being cleaned. A few exceptions were some cloth items, like chest protectors for baseball and softball, along with some mesh and canvas bags. A lot of paper products were soaked and had to be thrown out.

Getting the building back in shape wasn’t the only problem for the recreation staff. They had to relocate their workspace to the Board of Commissioners meeting room in Town Hall.

That meant setting up tables with laptop computers. On days when the commissioners met or some other group needed the meeting room, the recreation staff had to tear down their tables and chairs and move to a hallway.

Now, finally, all the uproar is coming to an end. Dove hoped to move back into the recreation center by Tuesday, Jan. 22. But he doesn’t expect the building will be fully operational on that date. “We’re probably going to have to ease into it,’’ he said.

The good news for the recreation staff is the gymnasium was spared some of the damage the main building suffered and has been open and in use since the second week of December.

The doors connecting the gym to the main building are roped off. There are porta-potties outside the gym. People have to access the gym by a side door, but at least it has been available for activities.

Dove’s main concern now is to get the fitness room ready and the court for a game called Pickle Ball usable again.

Both Dove and Hope Mills Mayor Jackie Warner praised the recreation staff for dealing with making repairs to the damaged facilities while still doing their jobs and working out of temporary quarters in Town Hall.

“They’ve worked like it was a regular work day,’’ Warner said.

In addition to the regular activities of the recreation department, Warner praised the staff for handling the additional challenge of special events like Ole Mill Days, Breakfast with Santa and the annual Hope Mills Christmas Parade while being out of their natural quarters.

“They’ve had to deal with adverse situations and they’ve done a great job,’’ she said. “They’ve been most pleasant and agreeable to whatever changes had to be made.’’

Hope Mills tackles flooding woes at C. Wayne Collier Elementary School

12flooding1 At the most recent meeting of the Hope Mills Board of Commissioners, town leaders began to take concrete steps toward dealing with a serious issue of flooding along streets near C. Wayne Collier Elementary School.

A large number of trees that once stood on the property at the elementary school were removed not too long ago.

A recent rash of hurricanes and increased rain has turned the roads surrounding the school into frequent sites of flooding, posing both a traffic hazard for people driving there and a regular flooding headache for people with homes near the school.

“One inch of rain will puddle in those ditches,’’ Hope Mills Mayor Jackie Warner said of the situation. “If they have any amount of rain over a short period of time, there’s flooding.’’

Warner said the loss of the trees on the property at C. Wayne Collier is the heart of the problem.

When the trees were in place, the water running off from the property was absorbed by the roots of the trees and the ground.

Without the trees, the water runs off downhill, toward the ditches and the road in front of the school.

“We’ve had so much rain, it’s affected us more than it ever has before,’’ Warner said.

At the last commissioners meeting, town officials were joined by representatives of Cumberland County Schools, including CCS Superintendent Dr. Marvin Connelly. A representative of the North Carolina Department of Transportation was supposed to be at the meeting but was unable to attend.

Warner said Hope Mills town manager Melissa Adams is quickly working to convene a committee that will seek both a short-term solution for the flooding issue and a long-term fix as well.

Members of the committee will include someone from CCS and the DOT, along with town representatives, including Beth Brown, who is in charge of storm water, and Don Sisko, who heads the town’s public works department.

Warner said having representatives from all three groups will help make it easier to find a solution rapidly.

There is already a previous plan, drawn up in 2011, that could be modified to provide a solution to the flooding, Warner said. It needs to be explored to see if funding for dealing with the problem can come from DOT, the town of Hope Mills or the school system.

There will also be a question for funding ongoing expense if a retention pond and filtration system are placed on the school property, Warner said. “We’ll let the committee make some recommendations and bring them back to the board,’’ Warner said.

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