Hope Mills News

Roundtable aims to get Hope Mills citizens' input

15 Hope Mills Community RoundtableElected leaders are welcome but politics will not be the focus of a Hope Mills Community Roundtable sponsored by the Hope Mills Chamber of Commerce and Up & Coming Weekly. 

The event is scheduled at Harmony at Hope Mills, 7051 Rockfish Road, on Thursday. A meet and greet time is scheduled to begin at 6:15 p.m., followed by the roundtable at 7 p.m.

“We are glad to be hosting it with Up & Coming (Weekly) and Harmony of Hope Mills,’’ said Jan Spell, president of the Hope Mills Chamber of Commerce.

Spell called Harmony a wonderful facility that has been good to the chamber. “Now they’re wanting to be good to the residents of our community as well,’’ she said. “We hope that they’ll come out and express their voices so they can be heard, do a little learning and let us learn from them as well.’’

The roundtable will begin with brief presentations by local government leaders and town staff. While all citizens and elected officials are welcome to attend, Spell stressed this is not a political rally and should not be confused with a campaign event on the part of anyone running for office.

“There may be candidates there that the residents want to speak with,’’ she said. “Everyone is welcome to attend. This is an open forum for everyone, not just citywide but countywide too.

“Mostly we’re looking for our citizens to come and join us.’’

In addition to Spell, scheduled speakers include Cumberland County Commissioner Michael Boose and Hope Mills town finance director Drew Holland.

Up & Coming Weekly publisher Bill Bowman said his publication is sponsoring the event to give the people of Hope Mills a chance to learn what the Chamber of Commerce is doing in the community and to bring people up to date on the wonderful things that are going on in Hope Mills.

“The best way to do that is to get everybody together on an informal basis, to have an informal conversation about what they would like to see, what they like about Hope Mills and to meet the movers and shakers of the county and Hope Mills so they can identify people and start developing relationships with the town,’’ he said. 

Like Spell, Bowman stressed the event is not political in nature. “This is for the people,’’ he said. “No political agenda associated with it.’’

Bowman said the response to this first meeting will be gauged, and if it’s successful, future meetings could be held as frequently as quarterly each year. 

“We want to get people used to them,’’ he said. “It should be a lot of fun.’’

ALMS House braces for ambitious back-to-school effort

14 ALMSHOUSEAfter a successful summer of providing meals to children in need, the ALMS House in Hope Mills is gearing up for an even more ambitious project of a similar nature as school resumes in Cumberland County.

Over the summer months, the ALMS House provided an average of 20 bag lunches a week to children and some adults who needed them, getting much-needed support from the community in the form of donations of food and money.

A few weeks ago they got a call to help out with another program that received state funding to provide food to children if another organization would give them a location where the children could go to relax and enjoy the meals. That program ended in early August, and ALMS House was asked to pick up the ball for the remaining weeks until school resumed late this month.

Since that responsibility was added, the ALMS House  has been averaging 90 meals per day in addition to the 20 per week they had been doing. “It’s unbelievable how the community has stepped up and provided both funding and provisions for us,’’ said Delores Schiebe of the ALMS House. “It has just fallen into place.’’

Once school resumes, the pace at ALMS House will pick up even more as they begin providing take-home bag lunches for under-privileged children that school social workers have identified as likely to not have access to food over the weekend.

Schiebe said ALMS House will start packing some 250 bag lunches the first week of school, but as time passes the numbers will grow upwards of 450 to 500 bags per week.

“We try to make the bags as nutritious as possible,’’ Schiebe said. They include things like milk and natural fruit juice, not simply flavored water. Other items include ramen noodles, pop-top cans of spaghetti or other main course type dishes, beef jerky, cheese and crackers, fruit snacks and
a spoon.

These bags are designed to be taken home each Friday by students that have been identified by school social workers as children at risk of going without food over the weekend.

Schiebe said the number of bags increases because often a child will return from the weekend and say they shared the food with a sibling and ask if they could get an extra bag for them.

Since there are so many more children involved than the summer program, this is much more expensive for the ALMS House to handle and requires even more support from the community.

“We encourage cash because we go shopping,’’ Schiebe said of the process used to fill the bags each week.

Donations of actual food are also accepted, Schiebe said, including pop-top cans of meat or pasta or the microwaveable dishes that come in single-serve plastic containers. Bottled water is also welcome.

Volunteers came in this week at ALMS House to begin packing the first bags that will go out to the children this year.

Looking ahead, Schiebe said plans are in the works for the annual Peace, Love, Walk event, scheduled in October 19 at 4 p.m., that is a major benefit for the ALMS House. Members Credit Union is the primary sponsor of the walk. “We are looking for sponsors, walkers and vendors,’’ Schiebe said.

For further information on the walk and how to support it, Schiebe
 said people can contact the ALMS House or the local Members Credit Union office. 

The ALMS House can be reached at 910-425-0902. Members Credit Union is 910-425-6806.

Fall football preview: Gray’s Creek

18 01 Dalton PatrickCoach: David Lovette

2018 record: 7-5

Top returners: Kendall Evans, 6-3, 240, Sr., DT; Dalton Patrick, 6-0, 180, Sr., S/WR; Jerry Garcia Jr., 5-10, 170, Jr., LB/DB/RB; Ben Lovette, 6-1, 165, Sr., QB; Garrett Crockett, 6-3, 280, Jr., OL; Terry McLaughlin, 6-1, 180, Jr., OL; D.J. Crutcher, 6-1, 180, Sr., DB; Justin McClintock, 5-10, 200, Sr., LB.

Top newcomers: Jarrod Kenney, 5-8, 155, Jr., RB; Jalen Randall, 6-0, 230, Jr., DL; Jalen Johnson, 6-4, 200, So., DE; Robert Burks, 6-1, 175, Jr., DB; Jayden Williams, 6-4, 280, Jr., DT; Josiah Arreguin, 5-11, 165, Jr., DB.

18 02 DJ KrutcherTeam strengths: “We return experience on the offensive line and quarterback positions. On defense we return two All-Conference players in McClintock and Crutcher. The secondary returns three out of four starters and one of the better defensive linemen in Evans.’’

Team concerns: “Depth is always a concern.’’

Pictured from top to bottom: Dalton Patrick, D.J. Crutcher

Hope Mills makes push for ADA compliance

12 Ramp at lakeOne of the jobs of the North Carolina Department of Transportation is to monitor subrecipients of federal funding that fall under their watch for compliance with the Americans with Disabilites Act.

That’s why sometime last year the town of Hope Mills, as a municipality that receives federal money through DOT, got a letter from DOT checking in on the status of the town’s compliance.

Don Sisko, who heads the public works department for Hope Mills, indicated the town is taking an aggressive approach to making sure the process to assure facilities under town control are either already accessible or will be made that way as soon as possible.

Sisko noted the town only has control over upgrading town-managed facilities and property. Private businesses and other town entities not under government control don’t fall under the direct oversight of the town or Sisko’s department. 

To help make sure nothing falls through the cracks, the town has secured the services of the engineering firm of Stewart, Inc. “They have begun their field survey so they can do a self-assessment,’’ Sisko said. “It has to do with streets and sidewalks, facilities and programs.’’

Sisko said he’s already learned some things about ADA compliance that the casual observer likely wouldn’t even think of. A great example is the official town website. Under ADA regulations, it must be made accessible to people who having hearing or vision problems that makes normal interaction with a website difficult. 

That’s why it’s good to have a company like Stewart helping with the evaluation. “They are subject matter experts on this,’’ Sisko said. “The ADA law is itself is written in legalese. It’s good to have a good subject matter expert on your side to make sure you get done what needs to be done.’’

Toward the end of getting things done, the town has hired a specialist to help oversee the ADA compliance issue. Bruce Clark is the ADA coordinator for the town and has been in that position for about a month. “He’s ramrodding this part of the project,’’ Sisko said. 

In addition to the work that is being done by Stewart, the town will be soliciting public input through a variety of outlets . Sisko said it would be similar to the responses the town sought when the comprehensive recreation plan was being developed. “There are going to be public meetings advertised and surveys put out so we can actually get public input on it,’’ he said. “That will all be collated to help us develop a priority listing.’’

Sisko added that Chancer McLaughlin, administrator of development and planning for the town, will coordinate the public input effort.

The work to complete making the town ADA compliant won’t be completed in a short time. “We are realistically trying to get our plan set up to do everything within about 10 years,’’ Sisko said.

He added that the Board of Commissioners is on board and has money budgeted once the areas of need have been identified. They already began last year with upgrading the computer program for the town website. “This year we are starting to look at some of the physical things as well,’’ Sisko said. “We are waiting until we get the report back from Stewart.’’

But there is some work ongoing. The mill house that is being converted into a museum will require a wall to be removed so the bathroom can be modified to make it ADA compliant.

Work was recently completed on the new bulkhead at Hope Mills Lake, which included the installment of a ramp leading to the kayak launch and swim areas.

“That’s the last project we had on the books that we’ve completed,’’ Sisko said of the ramp at the bulkhead. “We are looking at pressing forward and going back to past practices and making the corrections on those, bringing that to compliance.’’

Sisko noted that  anyone with concerns about ADA compliance in the town should contact Clark. His phone number is 910-429-3387, and his email is bclark@townofhopemills.com.

“We’ll do our outright best to make sure whatever is brought to our attention either gets corrected or is programmed for correction,’’ Sisko said. 

Clark said the town already developed a public awareness notice that can be seen at all facilities open to the public as well as on the town’s website and all of its social media sites.

“It’s basically a position statement on where we stand in providing compliancy with ADA in our facilities and our programs,’’ Clark said.

“The 1,000-yard view of this program, of what we’re trying to get established here, is equal access, basically, equal access for everybody to our programs, to our facilities.’’

Fall football preview: South View

17 01 Kevin BrewingtonCoach: Rodney Brewington

2018 record: 11-3

Top returners: Matthew Pemberton, 5-9, 180, Sr., ATH; Kevin Brewington, 5-9, 165, Sr., WR; Mahlik Gonzalez, 6-1, 240, Jr., FB; Deshaun Rivera, 6-2, Sr., LB; Timel Smith, 5-9, 165, Sr., DB; J’marcus Ray, 6-1, 165, So, DB; Joshua George, 6-2, 235, Jr., TE; Michael Herbert, 6-2, 240, Sr., OL/DL; Tyrese Harris, 5-5, 155, Sr., RB; Taeveon Dove, 5-10, 265, Jr., OL.

Top newcomers: Ahmir Ashley, 5-10, 165, Jr., SS; Raheem Baldwin, 5-10, 165, Jr., S; Caesar Dais, 5-10, 260, Fr., OL; Bryan Brewington, 6-2, 190, So., DE/TE; Michael Breedlove, 5-9, So., LB; Isaac Evans, 5-10, 185, So., LB.

17 02 Timel SmithTeam strengths: “This year’s team will have experience along the offensive line. There will be depth at running back.’’

Team concerns: “The major concern is replacing eight starters on defense and replacing a 3,000-yard passer and a 1,000-yard receiver and their leadership.’’

Pictured from top to bottom: Kevin Brewington, Timel Smith

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